The call of Aristippus
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The call of Aristippus Epistle IV. To Mark Akenside, M.D. By the author of the three former Epistles of Aristippus. by Cooper, John Gilbert

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Published by printed for R. and J. Dodsley in London .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesEighteenth century -- reel 899, no. 19.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination16p.
Number of Pages16
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16979894M

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Aristippus of Cyrene (/ ˌ æ r ə ˈ s t ɪ p ə s /; Ancient Greek: Ἀρίστιππος ὁ Κυρηναῖος; c. – c. BC) was the founder of the Cyrenaic school of Philosophy. He was a pupil of Socrates, but adopted a very different philosophical outlook, teaching that the goal of life was to seek pleasure by circumstances to oneself and by maintaining proper control over both Born: c. BC, Cyrene. Aristippus (elder) was a Socratic philosopher that lived in Greece. He was a pupil of Socrates, and became close to Socrates even though his philosophical views differed. Aristippus believed the goal of life and living revolved around pleasure, seeking pleasure no matter what the circumstance is. There have been four men called Aristippus, (1) our present subject, (2) the author of a book about Arcadia, (3) the grandchild by a daughter of the first Aristippus, who was known as his mother's pupil, (4) a philosopher of the New Academy. Ancient Hellenic chronicler and historian Diogenes Laertius, who penned biographies of several reputed Greek psychologists and thinkers, mentions Aristippus in his extant text ‘The Lives and Thoughts of Eminent Philosophers’.However, details about Aristippus’ life are sketchy since the book was compiled some years after Socrates’ execution and large chunks of information were.

  Aristippus of Cyrene (c. BCE) was a hedonistic Greek philosopher who taught that the meaning of life was pleasure and that the pursuit of pleasure, therefore, was the most noble path one could pursue. Along with Plato, Xenophon, Antisthenes, and others, he was one of the followers of was also the first of Socrates' students to charge a fee for teaching philosophy and. Aristippus, (born c. bce, Cyrene, Libya—died c. , Athens [Greece]), philosopher who was one of Socrates’ disciples and the founder of the Cyrenaic school of hedonism, the ethic of pleasure. The first of Socrates’ disciples to demand a salary for teaching philosophy, Aristippus believed that the good life rests upon the belief that among human values pleasure is the highest and.   Aristippus was said to have been born in Cyrene, an ancient civilization in northern Africa, in BCE. As a young man, he was drawn to Athens by the fame of the not-yet-executed Socrates. Aristippus would venture to Athens sometime in . John Gilbert Cooper, writing under the pen name "Aristippus", Epistles to the Great (see also The Call of Aristippus ) John Duncombe, The Feminead; or, Female Genius (see also The Feminead and Mary Scott's The Female Advocate ) John Dyer, The Fleece.

  Aristippus of Cyrene, (c. c. BCE), was the founder of the Cyrenaic school of Philosophy. He was a pupil of Socrates, but adopted a very different philosophical outlook, teaching that the goal of life was to seek pleasure by adapting circumstances to oneself and by maintaining proper control over both adversity and : Paperback. Unlock This Study Guide Now. Start your hour free trial to unlock this Aristippus study guide and get instant access to the following. Biography; You'll also get access to more t Aristippus of Cyrene was founder of the Cyrenaic branch of philosophy. He was a student of Socrates who pursued a very different metaphysical approach, claiming that life's purpose was to gain pleasure for oneself through circumstances, and to have vigilant control on both adversity and progress. His philosophy is known as moral hedonism. One of his classmates was His colleague Arete. Aristippus of Cyrene, BC. Ancient Greek scholar, a student of Socrates and founder of the hedonistic "Cyrenaic School". Although his works do not survive, we have some knowledge of his doctrines from the account of Diogenes Laertius and, a little more fanciful, from Xenophon's Memorabilia.. Aristippus identified the pursuit of pleasure and avoidance of pain as the ultimate Good in life.